Nursery School in Southampton

Our Nursery

/Our Nursery
Our Nursery 2019-07-18T14:30:51+00:00

Brook Early Years Routine

8.00am Breakfast club – Children to have breakfast
8.30am Doors open – Registration, children to find their name and put on the board
8.40am Carpet time – Hello time, Wake-up Shake-up dance, Brook Early Years rules
8.50-11.00am Free choice time – Children to choose their activities
Adults to do Focussed activities around child’s play
9.30am Snack time
11.00am Tidy up time – Children to help tidy up
11.10am Carpet time – Story time and singing
11.30am Home time – Hand over children to parents/carers
Lunch group – Wash hands and have lunch
Quiet activities once lunch is eaten
12.00pm Doors open – Registration, children to find their name and put on the board
12.10pm Carpet time – Hello time, Wake-up Shake-up dance, Brook Early Years rules
12.20-2.30pm Free choice time – Children to choose their activities
Adults to do Focussed activities around child’s play
1.30am Snack time
2.30pm Tidy up time – Children to help tidy up
2.40pm Carpet time – Story time and singing
3.00pm Home time – Hand over children to parents/carers.
After session club until 3.30pm

The Foundation Stage of Education

Brook Early Years Pre-School provides a curriculum for the Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) 2012

Effective practice in the Early Years Foundation Stage is built on these four themes

  • A Unique Child
  • Positive Relationships
  • Enabling Environments
  • Learning and Development

There are seven areas of learning and development that shape our educational programmes. Three areas are particularly crucial for igniting children’s curiosity and enthusiasm for learning, and for building their capacity to learn, form relationships and thrive.

These three areas, the prime areas, are:

  • Communication and Language;
  • Physical development;
  • Personal, Social and Emotional development.

We also support children in four specific areas, through which the three prime areas are strengthened and applied.

The specific areas are:

  • Literacy;
  • Mathematics;
  • Understanding the world; and
  • Expressive arts and design        

None of these areas of Learning and Development can be delivered in isolation from the others, but it is expected that as children grow and develop the balance will shift towards a more equal focus on all areas of learning as children grow in confidence and ability.

Each area of learning and development is implemented through planned, purposeful play and through a mix of adult-led and child-initiated activity. Play is essential for children’s development, building their confidence as they learn to explore, to think about problems, and relate to others. In planning for this and guiding children’s activities, we reflect on the different ways that the children learn. We look at three characteristics of effective teaching and learning are:

  • playing and exploring – children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’;
  • active learning – children concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter difficulties, and enjoy achievements; and
  • creating and thinking critically – children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things.

As part of the Early Years policy to make sure that its provision meets the needs of each individual child, we take account of any special needs that a child may have. Brook Early Years provide an environment in which all children, including those with special educational needs, are supported to reach their full potential. Our policy and practice reflects the DfES Special Educational Needs and disability Code of Practice (2014). Each child is able to progress at his/her own rate in all areas of development, and this is true for children with or without disabilities or learning difficulties.

If you would like to discuss the group’s ability to meet your own child’s special needs please talk to Trisha the Head, Phil or Ness our Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators, or your child’s key worker.

Please read our Special Educational Needs and disability policy for more details. (link to policy page)

Our Inclusion officer is Phil Tudball.
Our member of staff responsible for one to one support is Claire Warrington
Our member of staff responsible for language and communication support is Kirstin McGregor
Our members of staff responsible for Social and Emotional well-being is Jess Fox
Our member of staff responsible for overseeing all the programmes is Patricia McGregor

Personal, Social and Emotional Development (PSED) are three building blocks of future success in life. They are closely linked to each other and often bracketed together as one area of learning and development.
Personal development (Being me) – how we come to understand who we are and what we can do, how we look after ourselves.
Social development (Being social) – how we come to understand ourselves in relation to others,
how we make friends, understand the rules of society and behave towards others.
Emotional development (Having feelings) – how we come to understand our own and others’ feelings and develop our ability to ‘stand in someone else’s shoes’ and see things from their point of view, referred to as empathy.

  • Starting the process of successful PSED is essential for young children in all aspects of their lives. It will help them to:
  • relate well to other children and adults
  • make friends and get on with others
  • feel secure and valued
  • explore and learn confidently; and ultimately to
  • feel good about themselves.

At Brook Early Years we have an appointed Social and Emotional Aspects co-ordinator who works with individual children and with groups of children to nurture either emotional development and along with staff can build a bigger and better picture of your child’s needs.

ECAT aims to improve the speech/language and communication skills of all children under 5.  ECAT was set up in response to a wealth of research, which found that upwards of 50% of children on school entry have some speech, language and communication needs.
The overall aims of the ECAT programme are:

  • To raise children’s achievement in early language development
  • To increase practitioner knowledge and understanding of children’s early language development and how to support it
  • To increase parental understanding of and involvement in their children’s language development

At Brook Early Years we have an appointed ECaT co-ordinator Julie, who works with individual children and with groups of children to increase their knowledge, experience and imaginative understanding, and therefore supporting their language development, extending children’s vocabulary so that children are confident and skilled communicators.